Green Coconut Chutney


GREEN COCONUT CHUTNEY


I tried my best to find a suitable synonym that didn't quite sound gross for "lick". Nothing came closer to portraying the homely feeling of deliciously enjoying that "Chatni". Hence, I'm going ahead saying that  "Chutney", a borrowed westernised term for "Chatni" actually means something that is so saucy and so delicious that you want to lick off the container. Chatni tells to lick!

I learnt young that most of the dishes are named either after the ingredients used, shapes, olfactory reasons, aromas or  sometimes even cooking in a particular type of cookware can name a food like pancake, kadhayi paneer etc.

I asked my mum in those questioning days as to why chutney is called a chutney. She replied because it is made "chatpata" and "jhut phat" meaning "tasty" and "instant".

Although people think Indian cuisine to be piquant, I believe India, the home of chutneys, must have a fair share of recognition only for their chutney making skills as their chutneys are so poignant and flavoursome luscious.

Chutneys were made fresh just before serving dependent upon the type of the main meal, the season or only with the ingredients available at the time of making them. 

I have grown up eating chutneys that were made with a wide array of fruits, herbs, seeds, nuts, vegetables and spices. 

Fresh chutneys were made on a traditional stone grinder known as "Sill-Batta" where "sill" is a flat limestone, and "batta" is a cylindrical grinding stone". I have seen my mum using the "sill-batta" effortlessly. She had mastered the art of using the stone grinder. 

Image courtesy https://www.pinterest.nz/amp/pin/541065342734887005/

I observed her smash all the larger pieces of coconut flesh using one side of the batta against the sill. She would then gradually include a bit of fresh ginger, few green chillies and a handful of fresh coriander or mint leaves into the coconut. At the end and with one last swipe, she would introduce some cumin seeds and salt bringing out the best piquant condiment the green coconut chutney. 

The tempering and a fresh squeeze of lemon juice only further enhanced this dip and so what's the secret of this recipe? It is really the order in which the ingredients are introduced into making this condiment. 

Having come from there, I have right enough reasons for not buying store-bought chutneys as for me they don't merely exist; they are neither "chatpata" nor "jhut phat".

I myself had had the privilege of grinding chutneys, fish masala and some other curry blends alongside my grandmother for several years before the technology made its way into our kitchen.I remember my grandmother frowning upon if we used an electric blender to prepare the meals.

Although I miss that ancient time of using a traditional stone grinder, I still blend my chutneys fresh, and this one is a classic green coconut recipe from my grandmother's old time.

This coconut chutney is an all time winner, kids friendly, crowd pleaser, gluten-free and savoury. It fits the bill to add a balanced poise when served along with a spicy dish or as a condiment to go with any bread, naan or steamed lentil. idlis. Here is our recipe!

GREEN COCONUT CHUTNEY

Preparation Time: 10 mins
Cooking Time: 5 mins
Total Time: 15
Yields: 4 servings

INGREDIENTS: 

½ fresh coconut, chopped into large chunks
1" fresh ginger,
1 green chilli pepper
salt as desired
1 tbsp. lemon juice
2 sprigs of fresh coriander, roughly chopped
1 tsp cumin seeds
½ cup water

 For tempering
1 tbsp. ghee, use any plant-based oil for vegan
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
¼ tsp asafoetida
1 dry red chilli broken into 2 pieces
8-10 fresh curry leaves

METHOD:

1) Put the coconut, ginger, green chilli along with ¼ cup of water and blend until all the ingredients form a whipped paste.

2) Then add coriander leaves, cumin seeds and salt followed by another ¼ cup water and blend to form a smooth , luxurious chutney. Remove in a heat-proof serving bowl.

3) In a skillet, heat the ghee/oil over high heat. Reduce the heat and add mustard seeds to crackle. Then add the broken chilli, asafoetida and curry leaves and give a quick stir ensuring nothing burns.

4) Next, pour this tempering on top of the chutney.

5) Just before serving mix the tempering and stir in the lemon juice, mix and serve.

Notes: 
1) You can use frozen coconut that is perfectly thawed but fresh is incomparable.
2) You can use coconut water while grinding this chutney for an extra boost of nutrients instead of plain water.
3) A clove of garlic adds the extra zest but be warned off the mouth smells later. Warning given!
4) A handful of mint leaves can also be added for the minty flavour if cilantro is not available.
5) 1 tbsp. of roasted Chana or peanuts can make this extra thick to go as a spread.

Serving Variations:

Serve as a dip or condiment with Idli, dosa, pakoras, samosas or even with any plain flatbread or chapati

• Garnish with freshly chopped coriander if desired. Try it!



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TRIED MAKING THIS RECIPE?

Please leave your comments and share a picture on Instagram at #lets_curry

Hasin

Comments

  1. I don't know much about Indian cuisine, but anything involves coconut has got to be delicious. The Idli at the background look very soft and yummy too.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Angie, those idlis are our family's favourite. I have put the recipe up on the blog for the them.

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  2. Love the way you express the recipes with such love and carefully selected words, which not only tells me a story behind the recipe but also expresses your deep involvement with each one of them♥️💕💕love

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    1. Thanks shahin, it's mutual admiration that I have for food and the way we learnt how to cook that makes every recipe so special and close to the heart. It's just not a list.of ingredients, it's list of memories too!

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  3. I don't think I've ever had a coconut curry since it is a shame because I love coconut and coriander. I also love mint so a little mint thrown in sounds wonderful as well. Have no idea what asafoetida is, so I looked it up. Interesting. A wonderful condiment for quite a few things. I can see using it as dip for a flour tortilla or a condiment for a vegetarian burrito and tacos. A little fusion of cuisines never hurts. :)

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    1. MJ
      Asafoetida is a must in South Indian kitchen. However, I must warn you about the pungent smell when it is raw, but as soon as it goes in hot oil, you will love it's smoky aroma. Hope you try it and let me know how you like it!

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  4. Mmmm, coconut. I've had it in curry, but not one that I've made. In the US coconut is most often found in sweet dishes, but it really works well in savory ones, too. This sounds like a wonderful recipe -- I'd probably eat it by the spoonful. And lick the bowl when I was done. :-)

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    1. John,
      You can't go wrong with this one..Please try it and I'm sure you will agree with me more! Thanks

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  5. I believe this is your best post yet. I learned a lot and mostly I learned that licking your finger when they have chutney on them is OK. We don't see fresh coconut here so I'll use my virtual taste buds to enjoy this one...

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    1. Ron,
      You made my day today! Thanks. Yes, why not be it chocolate or Chutney, it's perfectly normal and Ok!

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  6. Yum, must be so aromatic and the color is amazing!

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  7. This flavorful coconut chutney is so fresh and delicious. Fresh coconut is always so much better. We are certain we will be licking our fingers after we try this delicious chutney on our morning dosas. Stay well and take care.

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  8. I also add dalia to the coconut chutney. I love how simple this recipe is, yet packed with so many flavors and goes well with almost anything

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    1. Dalia sounds interesting Rahul, I make plain dalia chutney to go with masala dosa. This idea of yours is a must now for me to try! Thanks

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  9. Your chutney is gorgeous! And I'd love to dip some crusty bread right into the bowl!!

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  10. Hasin, this looks AMAZING! I love anything with coconut so I'm super excited to try this recipe. I love that you have such wonderful memories of being in the kitchen with your mom and grandma. Preparing a meal today is always such a special time. Hope your day is a fun one, CoCo

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    1. Coco, the childhood kitchen memories will always have a special place for every child I believe! Thanks for the lovely comment Coco. Hope you enjoy your week too!

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  11. Wow, this sounds delicious, Hasin! I must admit that I'm super intrigued by the sill-batta - this is the first time I've come across one. My wife is a huge fan of chutneys, and I knew she would be all about this green coconut version. Lick is the right word here - as in I want to lick my computer screen right now! Haha.

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    1. Thanks David, I knew I was risking using the word "lick" here, but there was no other way I could do justice to this chutney without using it! But glad I did ! Yes, sill batta is actually quite fascinating even to see! I'm sure your wife will enjoy this chutney! Good day David!

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  12. This chutney looks so wonderful -- flavorful and delicious!

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  13. Your chutney looks absolutely delicious! So bright and creamy I could seriously eat the whole bowl!! P.S I love how passionate you are about each recipe you make !! You teach me something new with every post!!

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    1. I take that as a complement definitely. Thanks for making my day, my week actually.

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  14. What a delicious curry! It's true that "lick" isn't a particularly elegant word. There are sayings, like "finger-licking good" and "lick the plate clean," but I'd consider those sayings to be coloquial at best. Still, I know exactly what you mean when you say that something is that good!

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    1. Jeff,
      I agree with you completely that some words are not elegant in print but in colloquially sound appropriate to the context. Writing has this limitation and sometimes we are forced to use certain words only to best describe and deliver the idea with close proximity to the real feeling. I struggled a lot too, but eventually context mattered and I'm glad I managed to convince you at it's usage. Thanks for agreeing!

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  15. Your chutney flavors are dynamite! This is such a fabulous dip, it would be so perfect for Christmas and Thanksgiving!

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  16. Wow ! that was a really interesting post on how chutney and lick go along together. By the way the chutney looks fabulous , and those idlis to go along look so tempting as well. Well done Hasin!

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  17. It look very beautiful and have such a unique color. Thank you for sharing recipe.

    New Post - https://www.exclusivebeautydiary.com/2020/09/viktor-rolf-bonbon-salvatore-ferragamo.html

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  18. This sounds absolutley delicious! I love chutney, but haven't had one like this before. I will have to have a go at making this!

    Thank you for sharing!
    Aimsy xoxo
    Aimsy’s Antics

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  19. This one is my all time favorite recipe.

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  20. That looks so delicious! I love the flavour of coconut and I can't wait to try this recipe!
    Thanks for sharing it!
    Julia x
    https://www.thevelvetrunway.com/

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  21. Lovely chutney color, hasin! look so refreshing, so good with those idly . Great click with the tempering, loved it. Always so informative post on how to make and about the recipe. Using lemons in the chutney is interesting , should try your recipe to see how they turn out, thank you for sharing the recipe, have a great day!

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  22. I can now see why they chutney its name - it looks so incredibly delicious! I admittedly haven't tried it before, but I enjoy the various ingredients that are used to make it, especially the coconut and green chili. I'll have to give this a try, and thanks for sharing this!

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  23. wow that stone grinder looks amazing. somehow i don't think i would have the wherewithal to manage it:) love the colour of your chutney and all the great flavours.
    cheers
    sherry

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  24. I love the sound of this and the beautiful green colour of the sauce.

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  25. Absolutely beautiful ! Love that stone grinder so much !

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  26. Yum!! I love coconut chutneys :)

    have an amazing sunday,
    Tiziana

    www.tizianaolbrich.de

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  27. Oh Hasin, the one and only chutney my daughter likes with every South Indian meal is this coconut chutney. I have never added mint leaves to it but I am sure it would taste good as well. Your idlis look very soft. Dis you make it from scratch?

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    1. Hi Balvinder, thanks for the appreciative comment. Yes, these idlis are made from scratch and the recipe is up on the blog. You can try!

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  28. looks so nice, i get hungry just from the pictures :)

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  29. I love the story behind this recipe and its name - so interesting, Hasin! And the colour and flavours in this chutney are absolutely stunning, I feel like having a bowl right now!

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  30. I have never had coconut chutney, by the ingredients I know I would love it...sounds so tasty...thanks for sharing the recipe Hasin.
    Have a great rest of the week!

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  31. Looks delicious.
    I really like young coconut and old coconut
    I've never made chutneys.
    Thank you for the recipe. One day I will try to make it ..
    Have a wonderful day..

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  32. I've never tried such recipe but I can tell simply with the pictures that it does taste WONDERFUL! I need to try your recipe ASAP!

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  33. Never made this dish before but it looks so nice so I will give them a try soon.

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